Plant Based 22
Plant Based 23

One of the issues here is some of the most famous sources of vegetarian Omega-3 are things like flax, chia, and other seeds. The problem is that they contain Omega-3 in the form of ALA, which is alpha-linolenic acid, an inactive form of Omega-3. The body needs to convert that into active forms to be used. The problem is that conversion rate is really, really low – 5% maximum. When you’re looking for an Omega-3 supplement, you need to be looking for Omega-3 DHA and EPA, the active forms traditionally found in fish oil.

— Chris Smith - Vegetology

Plant Based 21

We hear about Vitamin D2 and D3. Now, Vitamin D3 traditionally is an animal-source vitamin D, so that’s why it’s not suitable for vegans or vegetarians. The problem is that Vitamin D2 is very different to Vitamin D3. The easiest way to explain it is that Vitamin D2 is an analogue of Vitamin D, which means when it goes into the body it needs to be converted to behave like Vitamin D. Some data published suggested that Vitamin D2 is nearly 90% less effective than Vitamin D3. Thankfully there is now a source of vitamin D3 that is 100% plant source.

— Chris Smith - Vegetology